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Triggering stakeholders to think again

“We’re patient-driven, and our DNA tells us to lower primary care thresholds,” says Erik Hjelmstedt, new CEO of KRY Sweden, during a visit to Narva. The purpose of the visit? To discuss future medical care with Göran Hägglund and other participants from politics, academia, industry, and care systems.

Hjelmstedt said that KRY wants to combine increased accessibility with re-engineered processes and procedures so that there’s money left over while patients feel safe and secure. Innovation should benefit everyone.

He believes that digitalization will change the way we work and will play a crucial role in any future change process. At the same time, he is critical of the inaction and paralysis that characterizes Sweden’s medical care system.

UK politicians look at it differently. There you’ll find a totally different element of curiosity about digital health and medical care platforms.

Hjelmstedt said that whining does no good and that there are reasons for politicians to control cash flow – based on the realization that it’s about caring for patients in all situations. Care should be limitless, and it would be foolish not to have a national model to shorten waiting times and prepare for a growing and aging population. By moving parts of the care system to digital platforms, resources can be freed up. Patients in great need of face-to-face contact can be offered this type of care. The current study on digi-physical care choice appears to want to make digital care physical, i.e., face-to-face.

“We’re increasing accessibility digitally and physically (in care centers) and taking doctors back into service,” Hjelmstedt said, and added that an important parameter for creating good, efficient care is data continuity.

“We must build our own medical records system.”

He is resonating and humble – yet impatient about progressing in a changed world. He wants to push on – on a large scale – not in pilot projects.

“We improve care and get other players to think again.”